The not so invisible boy

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When I came across Trudy Ludwig’s book The Invisible Boy, I couldn’t wait to use it with my students. In the overly social environment that is most schools, the quiet kids tend to be overlooked. I know this because I was one of those quiet kids, and now I’m that quiet adult.

brian

I absolutely love the way Brian, the “invisible” boy in the book, is shown through beautiful pictures existing among his classmates, but not really noticed by many. At the same time, the pages showcase Brian’s many talents and positive attitude, regardless of how he is treated. The use of black and white vs. color pictures draws the students in from beginning to end.

I ended up reading this book with grades 2nd-6th, as the messages inside are so varied that all ages enjoyed the story. Particularly, my students had great discussions about why Brian felt invisible and how he helped a new student feel welcome, even when he wasn’t feeling so welcome himself.

When we got to the page that posed the question, “Brian wondered which was worse, being laughed at or feeling invisible,” I polled the class for their thoughts. Their opinions were split pretty equally, in each class.

After we read the book, I prompted the students to use their creativity to write or draw three ways they could help a kid like Brian feel welcome in their classroom. Many of them had some pretty great ideas! These two are from a third grade class:

invisible boy pic1   invisible boy pic2I love it when the book I choose has enough depth that it takes up most of the lesson, while capturing students’ attention cover to cover. This book is one of those!! The topics it covers is vast – diversity in personality, appreciation of differences, celebrating talents, friendship, teasing/bullying, respect, kindness, and much more.

If you haven’t read The Invisible Boy, do yourself a favor and get a copy!

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3 thoughts on “The not so invisible boy

  1. This is so touching! We (Alumni Toolkit) do all our work with alumni and it’s been so inspiring to have alumni back in the classroom who can connect to students who are the: quiet ones, high-achievers, on ‘free lunch’, having difficulty focusing. They can look to alumni and think, “Huh.. the obstacles are temporary and I can turn out like that!” Do you think this could be adapted to various age groups?

  2. We are using it in our guidance classes this week ! We have had some great conversations surrounding being ignored vs.being laughed at by others. Great book !

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