Things I learned from Carla (Miss Davis)

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We probably all know a Bradley Chalkers. A kid who struggles with social nuances and takes things a little too literally at times. A kid who, fed up with trying to understand others, retreats into his own world of loneliness, only opening up to miniature plastic animals in the safety of his bedroom. And a kid who attempts interactions with peers through intimidation, threats, and lies, and begins to believe that he truly is the monster everyone has written him off to be.

It’s the Bradley Chalkers of this world who really need School Counselors, and who remind us that there is good in everyone, even the supposed monsters.

theresaboyinthegirlsbathroomI recently ordered and read There’s a Boy in the Girls’ Bathroom by Louis Sachar to incorporate into a student book club next school year. The story, while written for 8-12 year olds, holds the most important messages for adults.

I immediately liked Miss Carla Davis, the new School Counselor at Red Hill School in the book. I could identify with her. She was eccentric, played by her own rules, and most importantly, she was there for her students above anything else. 

Carla taught me a few things and reminded me of the essence of my chosen profession. I’m so thankful for Carla. In keeping with the nature of the beautiful relationship between Bradley and his School Counselor, here’s a letter from me to Carla, explaining all that she taught me.

Dear Carla, 

I believe in paying it forward and sharing the great things I see. And you, Carla, are great. I am inspired by your tenacity to put your students above everything else at your school. It’s not easy to do this when administrators and parents are not understanding of your role or your reasons for doing what you do.

You have reminded me of two of the most important aspects of School Counseling. One being unconditional positive regard. You always believed in the best for your students and they felt it. You weren’t jaded by other peoples’ opinions of certain students and you refused to believe that any child was a monster. Students need someone to believe in them, no matter what. Thank you for reminding me of that.

The second most important aspect of School Counseling that you display with such ease is meeting each student where they are at. You know that you can’t start talking to a student about homework completion when they don’t even have safe place in their classroom. You  know that if a student is bringing up monsters from outer space, it’s a topic to be explored because there’s something to it for that student.

I love that you let students think for themselves, instead of being the great problem solver you’re sometimes expected to be. By letting students come to their own solutions, you are allowing them to build the self-esteem needed to try new things.

What I admire most is that you don’t squander from your professional values, even when put in the hot seat by administrators and angry parents. This is a great role model for School Counselors all over who are given inappropriate tasks that take away from their students, but who are often afraid to speak up or to say no. You light the way for all of us!

Lastly, I want to say that I sincerely hope you return to School Counseling eventually. The profession needs great people like you.

Love,

Kayla

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2 thoughts on “Things I learned from Carla (Miss Davis)

  1. I think every child, parent and teacher should read this book. It is wonderful! Sometimes we have no idea the struggles that others face and it helps to realize that sometimes the burdens are hard to carry.

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